Every commercial industry has a unique jargon or set words that it uses. The auto shop/collision industry is no different. Have you ever taken your car to an automotive repair shop and overheard the technicians discussing your car and wondered; what the heck are they talking about?  If you don’t know the lingo, it may seem intimidating. Well, Pete Solis Collision Center wants to put our customers at ease when they see us. That’s why we are going to take some of the mystery out of understanding common auto shop talk.

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First up, “OEM”. This term simply means Original Equipment Manufacturer. It refers to repair parts  that either came directly from the original vehicle manufacturer or its contracted supplier. This ensures that you are getting the parts that were originally designed for your car, and not aftermarket parts.

Speaking of “Aftermarket”. This term refers to parts that are made and sold by companies not officially contracted by the vehicle manufacturer. Aftermarket parts are much like generic drugs in the pharmaceutical industry. They usually will meet the same standards of the OEM parts, if they come from a quality aftermarket supplier.

Next up is “Betterment”. This one is more of an insurance term. It means that the replacement parts on your car are new, thus improving your car’s overall condition.

This next one has nothing to do with your weight. A “Beltline (Waistline)” is what auto repair shops refer to when they are speaking about the area that separates the top portion of your vehicle from the bottom. This area is formed by the lower edges of your vehicle’s windows.

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The following acronyms all denote where the power from your car’s engine is ultimately transferred  towards. RWD (Rear Wheel Drive) means the engine’s power is transferred to the rear wheels. FWD (Front Wheel Drive) means the power is transferred to the front wheels. AWD (All Wheel Drive) means the power is transferred to all 4 wheels at the same time.

Next up is “Torque Steer”. In a FWD, front wheel drive car, if your steering wheel begins to turn during fast acceleration this is what is known as torque steer. Too much acceleration can sometimes overwhelm the steering in front wheel drive cars causing the driver to lose control of the vehicle.

In the world outside of car repair, the letters “N/A” can mean not applicable, not available, or no answer. But in automotive terms, it means naturally aspirated. This refers to an engine that does not use a turbocharger or a supercharger to force more air into the engine.

When you first start up your car for the day, or even when you start up after not driving a long while, your car will “Fast Idle”. What happens here is that the idle speed of your car’s engine will automatically increase to improve engine performance and give the engine a chance to warm up.

Finally, our last term to define is “Hesitation”.  This is the temporary loss of power that is felt during the initial acceleration of your vehicle.

The preceding list was just a few of the most common auto shop terms. Believe that there are many more, too many to list here; but this is a good start and we hope you get a better overall understanding.

 

Drive Safely!

 

Pete Solis Collision Center is El Paso’s Auto Body Shop! With over 47 years of experience behind us, we are the top choice for bodywork, paint, and more. We are the home to ICAR certified professional body shop technicians, as well as quality Sherwin Williams Automotive Finishes. Pete Solis Collision Center is located at 1434 Lomaland Dr. in El Paso, Texas. Give us a call today at (915) 599-8666. We are open Monday through Friday from 8:00am to 5:00pm.

 

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